The Illinois Housing Development Authority (IHDA) will administer a COVID-19 emergency rental assistance program this spring. 

The Illinois Rental Payment Program (RPP) is funded by a $500 million grant and will help tens of thousands of Illinois renters avoid eviction and stay safe in place during a public health crisis. 

IHDA is currently developing RPP with an anticipated launch date of April 2021. 

To receive financial assistance through RPP, tenants must meet all of the following conditions:

  • Household’s total gross income cannot exceed 80% Area Median Income for location
  • The household has experienced a loss of income due to COVID-19.

Learn more here

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a federal agency focused on consumer security - issued a report that warns of widespread evictions and foreclosures once federal, state, and local pandemic protections end. 

Currently, over 11 million families are behind on rent or mortgage payments. Homeowners alone are estimated to owe over $90 billion in missed payments. 

CFPB says that the federal government is going to great lengths to protect homeowners and renters. 

Recent action by the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, prohibit lenders from foreclosing on most mortgages until June 30, 2021.

After June 30, families who cannot resume regular payments will need to make arrangements with their lender to avoid foreclosure. 

Learn more here

Join KSN attorneys, Janelle Dixon and Kelly Elmore at 6:30 p.m.tonight for a free seminar series tailored to property managers, condo owners, homeowners, landlords, association members, and board members.

Topics include contract review, business decisions by the board, and critical changes in law.

This course is approved by the Community Association Managers International Certification Board (CAMICB) to fulfill continuing education requirements for the CMCA® certification. 

Register here

It's not easy taking responsibility for your condo or homeowners association. If you are a board member, you may face a lot of expectations about how you handle your role. Here are 7 ways that you can make your time serving your association as successful as possible:

Prepare Ahead of Time

Whether it is a board meeting, public meeting, or local event, start planning well in advance and informing the people who will be involved.

Know the Documents

Your governing documents outline specific rules and processes that need to be followed to effectively run the HOA. Understanding these documents will help you build credibility with residents and avoid potential violations. 

Improve Communication

Communication is key for any homeowners association and you need to be clear and effective in your communication with residents living there. Exchange contact information and post community updates to a website. 

Get People to Attend Meetings

Try to make meetings more fun and encourage participation by having snacks available, giving away small prizes, or even playing games.

Play to People’s Strengths

Make sure everyone has a role that plays to their strengths. If you’re new to the job, take the time to get to know everyone and ask them what they’re best at and what role they would prefer to have.

Encourage Community Spirit

If everyone in the community feels involved, you’ll have an easier time keeping it up running smoothly. Instilling a sense of community pride is one of the best things you can do during your time as president. 

Learn from Your Mistakes

You’re going to make mistakes but make sure to learn from them so you don’t make the same mistake twice. 

Pay Attention to Details

Focusing on the little details, like getting more people to the meetings, studying your documents, and encouraging community spirit, you’ll do a much better job at running things. 

Learn more here

In 2020, nearly 4 million cable/satellite television subscriptions were cancelled as consumers made the switch to streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, and Disney +. 

While most consumers currently use wires for broadband internet service,this is changing as consumers now favor wireless broadband internet.

In 1996, the FCC adopted the Over the Air Reception Device Rule, or OTARD rule. In short, the OTARD rule prohibits homeownersassociations and condominium associations from placing restrictions on residents which impede the installation, maintenance, or use of satellite dishes, TV antennas, or wireless cable antennas.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) made an important change to its Over-the-Air Reception Device rule, which now ncludes small antennas used for wireless internet in the list of other antennas community associations must allow, preempting any local laws or community association rules related to antennas.  

Luckily, boards do not need to spend money on a rule change, they just need to comply. 

Learn more here

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Seminars & Events

Wed May 19 @ 1:00PM - 02:15PM
Community Conversations Live Virtual Event
Thu May 27 @12:00PM - 03:00PM
M-206: Financial Management – Virtual Live Edition
Fri May 28 @12:00PM - 03:00PM
M-206: Financial Management – Virtual Live Edition
May 2021
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